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to southern europe. >> and then south korea's presidential election, yes, it's not just japan, and what to expect from the winner. >>> let's just plug you into where we are with this global market. more now on the global trading day in europe. 5-4 advances just about outpace decliners on the dow jones stoxx 600. most european stocks were up yesterday. the dax up 13 points. the dax, second highest close of the year, still up 27.5% for the year. right now, the ftse sound, the cac kron, closed at a fresh 52-week high. and the ftse is up 13 points despite falls from italian banks. let's show you where we are as far as the bond yields are concerned. we just check in. italian yields, 4.4% on the year. we'll show you the twos and tens, as well. i'll give you more on how that compares to where we closed yesterday. so the two-year, that's the low where we were yesterday. 10-year spanish yields, 5.581%. two-year yield, 2.35%, kind of where we were yesterday, too. and they're continue to go appreciateslide slightly from yesterday's close. as far as currency markets, 1.2880 was the two-week low on
's take a look at how markets are trading. stoxx europe 600 is down about .6% this morning, this after word that house speaker john boehner's plan b didn't come to a vote last night. he couldn't get them in place apparently. we'll have plenty more on the impact of that on the program. not much here, we see decliners well outpacing advancers. the ftse mib in italy down .6%. the ibex down .4%. the dax selling off .5% lower than yesterday. same goes for the ft. if it is, down .8%. 5909. how quickly we've gone from talking about 6,000 to talking about 5,900. the german bund rallying. same goes for the uk. we're seeing a rotation into safety, out of risk and out of spain and italy. about 4.5% for italy. thin trading in markets is exacerbating the move that we're seeing as we approach the year. today, the austy dollar is weaker against the u.s. dollar by about .4%. proxy there for global growth prospects. the dollar/yen is weaker by about .25%. this as markets digest the news out of the boj and gauge whether they'll be successful in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so
weighing on investor sentiment today. in europe, it was the last trading day of the year, and what a year it has been. our correspondent has kept an eye on the trading floor all year for us. he sent us this report from the floor of the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the year has ended a very successful 2012, also for the frankfurt exchange, which is why you see tables and chairs where there usually are not. there will be a celebration here shortly, and there is something to celebrate -- the dax performed to the tune of about 30%-plus this year, and many shares went up. only a few lag behind. the best shares almost doubled in value. when you look at the second tier, there were some that more than doubled in value. demand mostly responsible for that, according to -- the man most responsible for that according to everyone here is mario draghi. he promised the european central bank would do everything in its power to preserve the euro, and that really release energy and restored some confidence also for the bureau. in 2013, people see more share market. the dax could reach a new record highs. p
20 years. so look, and a lot of this is down to problems, i guess, in europe, right? what is the outlook with what happens with global growth and what is happening? >> unsurprisingly, the volume of growth of trade are strongly correlated to the volume of growth. so growth slows down. trade slows down with a sort of multiple. that's the main reason. there may be other marginal reasons like, for instance, difficulties in trade finance. which is a sort of the aftermath of the financial crisis. but the reality is that the main export market of the senate, which is europe, is not doing well. the second export market is not doing that well. not to talk about japan. so this has a slowdown effect which reverb rates on the growth of emerging countries. >> and i know when you see what's happening in italy, will this, the political developments in italy that cause more instability and less reform there, are you concerned that will have a further destabilization impact? >> no. i mean, i think it comes at a time where we are starting to see an exit, a crisis exist by europe. whether th
and focus on just one section about demands on the burke that in europe. quince not very long ago americans and europeans pride themselves on religious toleration and understanding. and animosity and violence including such bloody episodes as the wars of religion, including as well be quieter violence of colonial religious domination by europeans in many parts of the world and added to that, domestic anti-semitism and anti catholicism and culminating in the horrors of nazism which implicated not only germany but many other nations as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketp
on the fiscal cliff. equities falling on wednesday in the u.s. on thursday when we opened here in europe, yesterday we saw a relatively stable markets. we closed out on a flat to slightly higher note for most of our european markets yesterday. this morning coming into trade, we're pretty flat. we've taken a bit of a dropdown on this drop but we're just a couple of points lower. in the asian session overnight, we managed to see gains back again. they lost again on the notion of the fiscal cliff not happening. shanghai composite higher by just over 1% in today's session. hang seng, and the kospi closing slightly higher across the board. the european markets mixed, but the ftse 100 still flat to higher. we're all looking towards these fiscal cliff negotiations. at the moment, we've got a couple more days of trade before we get to the end of the new year, as well. most analysts out there, they've been saying we're going to see a relatively flattish end to the year from where we are now given that we've seen such an increase of equities in the past 12 months. we've seen stellar outperformance
the way to europe. the destination norway. it's not for eating. it's being made into sake in the same traditional way it's been brewed in japan for centuries. >> reporter: in the norweigan capital, sake is getting popular. many people like to drink with their meals. >> translator: this is made in norway using japanese rice. it's really good. >> reporter: the flavor is tr fruity with a slight acidity. >> translator: i'm very proud of the sake made in norway. >> translator: i usually drink red wine but i love sake too. >> reporter: as europe acquires a growi ining taste for japanes food, demand for sake is increasing. europe's first and only sake brewery is here in the south of norway. it was set up two years ago by a local beer company. the brewer is from canada. he first discovered sake nine years ago and was amazed a complex flavor could be made from rice and water. three years ago he met the owner of this brewery at a sake workshop and was invited to norway to help start a production. >> it's very rewarding. >> reporter: it's brewed in the yamahi style. it produces a more complex, y
government. do not and do what was done by us. do not criticize europe or try to get out of europe. play an active role in it. all of the points he was making almost directed at soviet gross tony who has said he will run for prime minister and has criticized the work of mario monti in the last few months. mario monti was talking about silvio berlusconi's ideas. it would be wonderful if the things could be scrapped. he has come out with popular statements that we will scrap what monti has done. monti has said it is not possible because italy needs the money. he is laying out an agenda. he was still doing it and will live. they are things he hopes will take place next february. we do not know what party will play in the government. he has not announced who will run as. mr.. will he play any part in the next government? will he allow them to use his name? we do not know yet. we will listen. >> the vote is over but not the controversy. the muslim brotherhood says the people who voted in favor of the new constitution. official results will not be known until a released monday. the draft const
let between innovators coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which has fostered a suspicious negotiation and character they can see right of into the politics in bucharest to this day and i can go to every country, not every but many countries and talk about but. >> talk for a moment about germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in t
turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i talked to pulitzer prize winning historian anne happalbaum. >>> the administration had a choice save chrysler by injecting taxpayer dollars or let it fail and let it lose perhaps a million jobs. car czar steve ratner gives us a fascinating inside look. for viewers in the united states, we have a special tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific called "tough decisions." >>> but, first, here's my take. announcing that he would send proposals on reducing gun violence in america to congress, president obama this week mentioned a number of sensible gun control measures. but he also paid homage to the conventional washington wisdom from mental health issues to school safety. his spokesman jay carney said earlier this is a complex problem that will require complex solution. gun control carney from the only answer. let me respectfully disagree. the problem is not complex and the solution is blindingly obvious. there are three sets of causes that people point to when talking about events like the one in newtown. fir
politics and compromise. everyone knew about the growth. just like in europe. means it could be, in fact, reduced dramatically. fewer jobs, larger deficit. not smaller. and the federal reserve that's throwing up its hands, can't do anything. as i said last night, it doesn't matter. we can pick our stocks and buy them down. like the fabulous names, amazon, ulta salons. buy them down in scales like i outline in the book "real money." now suggesting other groups giving you a bang for the buck. new groups betting that the hope will be squeezed out and the bottom gets put in before a deal is made -- or not. why not? we know the auto market is for 11 years now and we have been sweet on ford domestically. before sandy. where are we internationally? europe. what are some of the other key area, though? i think latin america, though. i think it's coming back. asia already turned. here's the new piece of data. i think europe could be stablized. ford is the one to watch. you get that thing at 11 or blow. i'm out blessing it. haven't done that in a while. in europe i'm thinking that i'm sanguine. exc
for the economy. and the transaction tax is being taken very seriously in europe and probably will happen there, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [caption
that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have to ask yourself is when cash, equities, credit, government bonds, where do you want to be. and equity in my mind mind is absolutely not. you need good growth numbers to justify the equity markets going up. now, i think there's a lot of investors looking at the yields on ghoechlt bonds or credits and that's motivating them to move into equity. i think the numbers are actually going to be relatively small. and i would certainly advocate against doing that because as you were saying, weak numbers, unless you see some much strong
previously thought, although the session still looks very much on course for another quarter here for europe. the pmi will rise above 50 that divides growth between contraction. hasn't stopped the euro/dollar from hitting a one and a half month high. i suppose we know growth is going to be anemic, but if spanish banks are getting some money, are we feeling slightly better? >> that's what euro trades on, isn't it? pmis are all very interesting for the economist. but they want bigger stories. most of the news flow, it's helpful to the euro. people have been trying to affect this rally for a while. we are close to those october highs. the news flow has been good, i would say. >> we hit, what, nearly 131.80? >> before that, we go 131.40. the enthusiasm for euro is surprisingly good. we're surprised by how far this rally has gone on pretty thin news sometimes. >> i just want to recap what we've got. eurozone finance ministers meeting in brussels. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in
next month. tech stocks fall in europe after ericsson unveils a swedish crown writout related to its loss chip venture. >>> reports say the intercontinental call is in talks to buy euro next. >>> and vows to continue the current government's battle against japanese territorial claims. >>> japan's central bank has decided to extend its asset purchase program to $120 billion. it will review the bank's stance on price stability next month. abe has been putting pressure on the boj to raise its inflation target to 2% as part of efforts to fight deflation. for more on the fallout or the impact here, let's talk to luca from asia pacific. you look like you're in mourning here, but it sounds like the bank of japan has delivered pretty much what the market was looking for the. >> yes. it was delivered in order to be seen as losing independence after the campaign, very aggressive campaign from the ldp party on the bank of japan independence. actually, what -- the only policy they didn't really try, according to ldp, was being extremely aggressive, not as -- or much more aggressive than what the
been a resurgence of developed markets, europe particularly, and investors who left that market, that's been a great place to be for the last few months. there's so much focus on fiscal cliff. i think that's very hard to do on a day to day basis. for multiasset portfolios, the rest of the world is a good story right now. >> because we're so dominated by these issues in washington. rick santelli, some enthusiasm going on in these markets today with the anticipation of perhaps a deal. do you buy into it? is that what you're seeing in chicago? >> first of all, there are many expecting a deal. down in chicago, we don't just hope for a deal, we hope for a reform-oriented deal. to just do a deal without tagging it to reform is just going to make more of the same at some future date. the treasury complex really, really unfazed by just about all of it. briefly, we're under a 158 yield. haven't been there since second week in november. after 815, 118,000 jobs, interest rates were never as high as they were before that number. that really set part of the stage for treasuries. >> and you guys do
and india where there's a big social agenda, you have a different form. anyone europe, southern europe, northern europe, different forms, but in northern europe, the informed capitalism, where the government believes in strong social safety net, believes in paying for health care, believes in playing a role in determining what businesses grow or fail, and they're creating more jobs than we are. so we have to be careful when we, as we sometimes do in the united states, get up on our high horse and say we understand capitalism. actually what's going on in the world is a competition between different versions, and if our version produces more inequality, produces less growth, it's -- is seen as less fair and others are seep as more fair and producing growth, who do you think is going to win that arguement? >> host: a lot of people say the northern european countries, norway, sweden, et cetera, is socialists. is socialism a term that is outdated? >> guest: i think it is. let's take an example. car companies going bankrupt during the last cycle. america, big capitalist country, doesn't have
you very much. a key session in japan overnight. >>> as we pivot our focus to europe, you see stocks addi adding .3%. consistent with the rally we've seen over the last several trading sessions and apparently having plenty to do with the possible resolution of u.s. fiscal talks. we'll have more in a little bit. the survey also helping to lift sentiment or keep it buoyant. look at the major borses. green in the harder hit regions. ftse mib, spain up better than 1%. consistent with the rally we saw yesterday. remarkable. the xetra dax adding .1%. for its part, up to close to 30% this year. the ftse 100 adding .3. the bond space, we'll look at that and talk later about the big trades that have helped some hedge funds, for example, when it comes to greek debt. for the time being, mario's comments this summer is have techively kept the bond gleelds a tight range since then six months or so now, this is going. and differentiation across the space where italy price rising, not the case for spain which is seeing its yield up to 5.3. and i know we haven't mentioned this in a while, but i want
movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is all about intertemporal recycling. by effectively taking his hand and pushing it into the future, grabbing value that had not been generated. -- that is debt. producing the wealth, from which they hoped they would pay the debt. moneylenders, bankers. covering the fact that he had already paid wages, hoping that there would be something less for -- left for him. the fact that there is recycling -- you take a value for the future, bring it into the present, so as to develop -- delivered the body to the future. the problem with this process is once y
see stock markets in asia and europe up a bit. i think their expectation that washington will come to an agreement, i think that might be too early. i think this is still a very clear possibility that they could allow the deadline to pass and resolve this sometime in the middle of january. >> well, any red lution would be welcome. the cost as well, but these spending cuts and the tax rises effectively, the end of the tax concession, that's automatic. >> that is automatic yes but there is question where the money can be found if you like to plug the gap. they wouldn't have much impact for a while. but ultimately they would. and the difficulty is not necessarily the fact that the deadline, this deadline, which is some extent of official anyway would be overrun. it's more the uncertainty associated with it. how can you plan if you don't know what the tax rate will be? >> here in europe, one of the banks that caused a huge flurry at the time of its impact -- >> this could be a laymen of europe. we've had the euro in crisis which was sparked by soveren debt, which then destabilized debt
rea. >> hillary clinton earlier this month. it is believed it was while on her trip to europe that the u.s. secretary of state contracted a stomach virus that left her severely dehydrated. on her return home, she collapsed and severed a concussion. during a follow-up examination, doctors have discovered a blood clot. mrs. clinton is being kept under observation in this bill york hospital, receiving medication, and will remain here for the next 48 hours at least. she has been offered for the past three weeks. her illness prevented her from testifying before congress about the attack on u.s. diplomatic mission in benghazi. that killed the ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans. the department faced severe criticism. mrs. clinton who is the most traveled secretary of state in u.s. history is due to step down in the new year. many democrats want her to run for the presidency in 2016. her health is likely to be a major factory in making any decision. >> concerned about the health of the venezuelan president hugo chÁvez, suffering of further complications after ca
jointly accepted the prize. the prize committee said the 27-nation bloc turned europe from a continent of war into a continent of peace. rampai vowed to strengthen european unity andverce th economic crisis. however, critics say the prize is inappropriate, pointing out that the eu has failed to limit the impact of europe's economic troubles. those same critics are pointing at italy. what does this say about investors? >> it says that investors are selling bonds. that's why the yields are going up. it also implies these same people are getting cautious, incrsing cautious er the country. he says he will resign once the next budget bill is passed. the rates had been easing for about a month. the key index on the milan stock exchange plunged by nearly 4% ending the day with a 2.2% drop. the euro was traded lower against the dollar and the yen. the future of italian politics is now more cloudy. the announcement doesn't seem to have caused nu ed much trouble investers outside of italy. >>> over in the united states president obama said he is ready to compromise before plunging over the fisca
of this you focus on what happens internationally and china continues to recover. europe looks like it's stabilizing and we didn't change our strategy based on the news, just a little bit more of what you're doing. >> randy, anything change for you? >> no, not really. what we're watching is the parallels that occur now, where we stood with the fiscal cliff and where we stood in 1999 with the y2k situation. we borrowed a lot of growth in 1999 from 2000, and that led us to a recession. we're looking at the same thing now. we're seeing people have accelerated dividends, pre-payments, seeing a lot of companies that single proprietors are paying themselves this year in anticipation of higher rates. >> it's interesting that you point that out. it could be argued at the same time that we're delaying growth until next year because of the number of companies that have delayed hiring or capital expenditures because of the uncertainty about the fiscal cliff. >> yeah. well, uncertainty, unfortunately, is perhaps going to continue with this because the regulations are not going to go away there. ma
europe. and these guys are good. eventually they will develop an icbm that could reach the united states. >> the iranians are being continuing to amass technologies, learning how to enrich uranium, stockpiling low enriched uranium and it's getting to a level in which particularly one of iran's major rivals in the region, israel, is sounding the alarm bells and saying that the iranians are getting too close. >> graeme lawson, a great historian of the cuban missile crisis said that the iran nuclear issue is the cuban missile crisis in slow motion. (instrumental music) >> and north korea continues to make itself heard, regularly testing nuclear missiles despite international condemnation. >> it's estimated that the next time north korea tests a nuclear weapon it could be by highly enriched uranium, whereas the last two were believed to be through the plutonium route. so this is very problematic, not just because north korea having lots of fissile material is a bad thing, but north korea has a tradition of selling off anything that can garner hard currency on the open market. >> and though t
on ford domestically. what are some of the other key areas. asia already turned. i think europe could be stablized. ford is the one to watch. i'm out blessing it. in europe i'm thinking that i'm excited about ford. we have ample evidence today that i'm right. the rates remained too low. and pricing is moving up in california, nevada, arizona all things we learned from the luxury home builder toll today. that is fine. but what i hadn't heard is a demographic play, how the demographics are going to take over. household formation is unnatural and because of the great resection. well, from the delay of creation of new families, which is highly unusual, what makes that so special? the fiscal cliff could be a big deal. i'm going to put it in an amusing way, it is the need to get out of your mother in law's house. pretty intuitive concept when you think about it. we have a break here. because the market is so darn tough. and that could be your chance for the analysts. here is the bottom line. we need hope to be van switkwis. he so that it is so negative. have them leave the room. and we can
're cleaner than europe is right now. >> right. >> so we haven't felt it. my main worry is the following, that if the republicans and democrats can't get together to solve the fiscal cliff you will need an external force, a major market sell-off, you will need a major economic trauma to get them to poex. >> other things have been on the table. i want to talk to our viewers about a few of those as soon as we come back. coming up next, republicans want a new formula for inflation. it's called chained cpi. not a bad idea overall but it could slow the payments to social security recipients. the president has said he could agree to it but democrat lawmakers say no way. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inf
states, 7% china, 5% india, negative one in europe. in that environment you want to own a portfolio of multinational companies with dividends, global exposure, it will provide as good of a return as anything else when you have bonds and cash paying so low. as long as you understand you're in the seven, 8% environment, portfolio stocks should be part of that. david: let's talk to a guy that says full speed ahead torpedoes. he thinks it will be better than this year was. saying people are confusing pickups for heart attacks in today's market to all these problems are going to seem like nothing when we come to the big gains of next year. you really think that will bear out, and how do you invest with that kinddof optimistic strategy? >> first of all what we have seen with investor sentiment is contradictory to what we've seen with consumer sentiment and business sentiment. when you see negative investor sentiment is not just in the retail side but also the institutional side creating a great potential opportunity for performance. secondly if you take a look at kicking the can down the
keeps rates unchanged. europe continues to hang in there economically. >> and nat gas gets a boost. the government finds exporting it is better than keeping it here at home. >> apple as we mentioned in the spotlight today, shares of the tech giant coming off their worst day in four years, sliding back into bear market territory. the one day loss erased nearly $35 billion in market cap. that chunk is bigger than 400 other s&p 500 companies. apple ceo tim cook talked to nbc's brian williams in our rock center exclusive. >> why can't you be a made in america company? >> you know, this i found, as a matter of fact, the engine in here is made in america. and not only are the engines in here made in america, but engines are made in america and are exported. the glass on this phone is made in kentucky. so we have been working for years on doing more and more in the united states, next year, we will do one of our existing mac lines in the united states. >> you can see the entire interview with tim cook tonight on rock center, that's 10:00 eastern time on your local nbc station, but for now
. >>> and corporate news weighs on sentiment across europe. kpn shares fall after dividend and greco stocks plunges as analysts cut their outlook for the uk power group. >> okay. welcome. it's the start of a brand new week here on "worldwide exchange." and don't adjust your set, kelly and i are together. >> for once, for a day. >> but make the most of it because it won't be lasting. >> if only there were a slo-mo. >> i'm going to enjoy as much as i can of today. >> and likewise. and then we're going to have to get all of our u.s. voouers to find cnbc world because they could get three hours of you, carol and carolin for the rest of the week. >> whatever they can do. record it and fast forward to the good bits. >> yeah. >> it will be 2:00, 3:00 in the morning or whatever. >>> on today's show, plenty to come on. >> yes. the south american union faces ejection from the imf for allegedly cooking its books about the innation rate. we'll head out to europe where the swiss banking giants could be facing $1.6 billion over libor rate rigging allegations. >> and we'll be on the floor in beijing where china's
normally on boosting growth. >>> well, it's been a rel ofly good year for stocks in europe. adding about .3%. advancers mostly outpacing decliners on the index this morning. if we can zero in on the bourses, it's largely green behind me. the fits fits mib is atting .6%. the ibex in spain, up 0.8%. and the ftse up about 0.3%. now, some company-specific news this morning, fin mechanica saying shares up 2.4%. this on news they're set to buy sge-avio. safran is also a company considering that change. let's take a quick look at the bond space. we'll get a sense of the kind of trade we're seeing shaping up. it is consistent with flows into the periphery, perhaps out of the core and the risk on move generally that we're seeing this morning. yields up to 4.5 roughly in italy at about 5.4%, respectively. gilt is moving up towards is.9% this morning. the bund yield is still extremely low, so that spread between gilt and bund is widening. look at the euro/dollar. 1 1.3171. extraordinary. we're almost up at that 1.32 level. the dollar/yen is flat, right about 83.88. there we go. a little bit of movemen
, but we are cleaner than europe is right now. so we haven't felt it. my main worry is the following. if the republicans and the democrats can't get together to solve the fiscal cliff, then you will need an external force, you will need major market selloff. you will need a major economic trauma to get them to focus. >> there are other things that have been on the table. i want to talk about a few of those, as soon as we come back. coming up, the republicans want a new formula for inflation, it's called chained cpi, it could slow the growth in payments to social security recipients, that's got some people mad. the president has said he could agree do it, but democratic lawmakers say no way. [ bells dinging ] ♪ hark how the bells, sweet silver bells ♪ ♪ all seem to say throw care away ♪ ♪ from everywhere, filling the air ♪ [ female announcer ] chex party mix. easy 15-minute homemade recipes you just pop in a microwave. like caramel chocolate drizzles. happier holidays. chex party mix. happier holidays. santho, ho, ho!anta! santa! want to see some magic? watch this! merry c
data showing the private sector has expanded for the first time since april and signaling europe could avoid a recession in q4. >>> and japan's business sentiment sours in the fourth quarter. this reading comes two days before a nationwide vote that suggests it will hand the ldp position a landslide win. >>> we're going to give you all the latest results from the flash december data for the pmi for the eurozone that we're just getting out. the overall, the deposit is a touch stronger for the month of december. the details show the manufacturing weakened slightly and its services strengthened slightly. they are overall still in negative territory. and we're seeing the euro/dollar respond a little bit to the downside. down about 0.01% trying to fight back into flat on the day. 130.75 is the level there. again, the services pmi is at 47.8. compared with the 47 that was expected. it's a five-month high. the manufacturing pmi, 46.1. the manufacturing all told, 46.3. that's a bit under the poll of 46.6. with more on the reaction to these figures, we have rob doddson with us. rob, welcome. it
likely signal a partial shift away from her hard line stance on europe. and more danger may lie in wait for merkel outside of the country. merkel may have steered a steady course in the euro zone, sovereign debt and banking crisis, but the problems are far from over. >> we are still in the financial crisis and we don't know what state of emergency will pop up in the next year. the global economy will be a serious problem. >> 2013 may also be the year when germany starts to feel what much of the rest of europe has suffered through, the pain of a recession.
and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they cause suicide? >> i can promise, i'll get back to you, carol. here is what they say to me. i've had it all. but trying to get a debate going. i've been on two years on cnn. in that time, there's been a series of gun rages. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11,000 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. by comparison, britain has 35 as does germany and australia. japan has one or two. to countries that have strict gun control have very little gun murder. what do you say to americans who say it makes me feel safe? >> i think carole had it right. she said it
they are developing. in southern europe, northern europe or different forms, in northern europe, the government believes in a strong social safety nets, believe in paying for health care, believe in playing a role in determining what businesses succeed or fail and yet those governments have budgets that are balanced and growing faster than we are and creating more jobs than we are. we have to be a little bit careful when we as we sometimes do in the united states that are high horse and say we understand capitalism, actually what is going on in the world is a competition between different versions and if our version produces more in the quality and less growth is seen as less fair, and others are seen as more fair and are producing more growth, who do you think is going to win that argument? >> host: a lot of people would say the northern european countries are socialist. is socialism a term that is outdated? >> guest: i think it is. let's take an example that is big in the election campaign. car companies going bankrupt during the last cycle, america is the big capitalist country didn't have a
. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or two or a stamp attached to legal documents, publications, and the packages of non-essential products like playing cards. the harshest effects of this tax, however, were on members of three powerful special in
ownership. look at europe and the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. >> abbey, here is what they say to me. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. britain has 35 as does germany and australia. to countries that have strict gun kcontrol have little gun murder. i think carole had it right. she said it is about personal responsibility. that is the most important part. it is a difficult one. people are going to have an oh w pinion about it. we have to make sure that they were -- wanted the american people to feel protected about the british at the time. i don't think people should be able to go online and buy guns. there should be rules in place on background checks. our country is founded on these freedoms. i totally respect the constitution by the way. what i don't respect is what i don't respect is the interpretation of the letter of the second amendment of the constitution which i think is being misused to endorse everyone in america
by climate change? >> our economy is mainly based on tourism. incidently, mainly from europe. there have been changes in the patterns of the fish, so our whole economy is now at risk. if it continues like this, the seychelles, the sea level rise will not be our biggest problem but we will become a failed state. >> you are in the indian ocean. place yourself geographically with other islands off the coast of africa that you are near. >> we are in the group of 115 islands east of kenya, north of madagascar. we cover a huge area of the southwestern indian ocean. we're at the full mercy of what happens in the ocean. we are ocean people. anything that affects oceans, whether through increased temperatures, acidification, which is a bigger threat to khor reece that morning temperatures. >> what happened with acidification? why is that a result of climate change? >> we are reaching the limits of carbon dioxide and water can take out of the air. we have abused the oceans as we have abused the forests. >> people here have said they joked that they found something with a label made in the u.s.a., and t
of the former brish colonies. in europe the dax down about there about 35 points, around half a percent. and overnight in japan, the nikkei, the yen falling to a 20-month low. you have the nikkei up 1.5%. the nikkei -- yen versus the dollar as shinzo abe returns to office as japan's new prime minister, promising monetary and fiscal reforms. we have the shanghai composite there up about a quarter percent. >>> all right. in today's top stories, the u.s. is five days away from going over the fiscal cliff. president obama is cutting his holiday vacation short, returning to washington tomorrow to continue talks to try to avoid that automatic tax hike and spending cut combination. that's the same day that congress returns to town. before the president left town on friday, he suggested a stopgap measure to freeze tax rates for people making less than $250,000 a year and extend unemployment benefits. reports say white house staffers have been quietly working with senate democrats to come up with a plan to avoid the fiscal cliff, but little progress has been made. >>> a chinese ratings agency is
despite china and other emerging rising markets and that has been clear the past two years, where europe is in recession, japan continues to languish and yet the u.s. economy has shown resiliency but it is not immune from fiscal shock and that's something i clearly continue to monitor. >> all right, joe, thank you very much for coming on the practical. have we have good news for the in you year. thank you very much. >> you as well. thank you. >> joe davis, chief economist at ativan guard group >> susie: still ahead, the top tech trends for 2013, or how your cell phone will become an even bigger part of your life in the new year. >> susie: a lot of mixed messages for investors today. joining us now to sort through it all, ann miletti, senior portfolio manager at wells fargo advantage funds. >> so, anne, what do you think you heard, the economist talking about a mild recession. are we in for a correction in the stock market if that happens? >> i think right now the market is trying to predict how long this uncertainty is going to last. so right now, you know, because the market is a measur
your vision should be for adapting the paa that's in europe into asia? because leaders here have said they would like to do some sort of paa in asia. >> well, you asked a lot of questions in there. >> [inaudible] [laughter] >> well, let me talk about the sbx in general. you know, the sbx was built as a research and development platform. it wasn't designed to be in a long-term ballistic missile defense architecture. it still has benefit in research and development, but since it was built, my estimation is that the overall sophistication of the bmd capabilities have grown, and it's grown globally so that the need to have sbx in that role has diminished over time because other capabilities are mature enough to be able to not have to have it. as far as the ability for the intercepters to be productive, i think you have to look across all of technologies that we've pursued in bmd and recognize the that the significant technological challenges that have been associate with the that program and really i think you have in the time frame that we've had to develop these systems, i think we've d
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